Camel Milk Contains More Iron than Cow's Milk

Camel Milk Contains More Iron than Cow's Milk

The National Institutes of Health provides the following information about the importance of iron.

What is iron and what does it do?

Iron is a mineral that the body needs for growth and development. Your body uses iron to make hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body, and myoglobin, a protein that provides oxygen to muscles. Your body also needs iron to make some hormones.

How much iron do we need?

The amount of iron you need each day depends on your age, your sex, and whether you consume a mostly plant-based diet. Average daily recommended amounts are listed below in milligrams (mg). Vegetarians who do not eat meat, poultry or seafood need almost twice as much iron as listed in the table because the body doesn’t absorb iron in plant foods as well as the iron in animal foods.

Life Stage

Recommended Amount

Birth to 6 months

0.27 mg

Infants 7–12 months

11 mg

Children 1–3 years

7 mg

Children 4–8 years

10 mg

Children 9–13 years

8 mg

Teens boys 14–18 years

11 mg

Teens girls 14–18 years

15 mg

Adult men 19–50 years

8 mg

Adult women 19–50 years

18 mg

Adults 51 years and older

8 mg

Pregnant teens

27 mg

Pregnant women

27 mg

Breastfeeding teens

10 mg

Breastfeeding women

9 mg

 

What happens if you don’t get enough iron?

In the short term, getting too little iron does not cause obvious symptoms. The body uses its stored iron in the muscles, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. But when levels of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and contain less hemoglobin. As a result, blood carries less oxygen from the lungs throughout the body.

Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include gastrointestinal (GI) upset, weakness, tiredness, lack of energy, and problems with concentration and memory. In addition, people with iron deficiency anemia are less able to fight off germs and infections, to work and exercise, and to control their body temperature. Infants and children with iron deficiency anemia might develop learning difficulties.

Iron deficiency is not uncommon in the United States, especially among young children, women under 50, and pregnant women. It can also occur in people who do not eat meat, poultry, or seafood; those who lose blood, have GI diseases that interfere with nutrient absorption, or eat poor diets.

Camel Milk Contains 10 Times More Iron than Cow's Milk

One of the numerous nutritional benefits of camel milk is its iron content. Camel milk has 10 times more iron that cow’s milk. Camel milk can help you avoid the health issues associated with anemia while improving blood circulation throughout the entire body and oxygenation of the internal organs.

Camelicious camel milk contains all the nutritional benefits of camel milk in convenient powder form. Simply mix with water, or your favorite beverage, and enjoy the light, pleasant tasting milk knowing you are providing your body with nutrition it needs every day.

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