How Metabolic Abnormalities and Compromised Gut Health can Result in Cognition, Communication and Behavior Issues in Children

How Metabolic Abnormalities and Compromised Gut Health can Result in Cognition, Communication and Behavior Issues in Children

Recent decades have brought a staggering increase in children with cognitive, behavioral, and social communication problems, and many more special needs children than at any time in human history.

Doctors, researchers, and scientists are focused on discovering the underlying cause of this alarming increase. Recent research reveals that genetic susceptibility and environmental influences, or both, appear to be linked to the 10-fold increase over the past four decades.

Over the past three years, research scientists have discovered that many special needs children also suffer from metabolic disorders. A set of metabolic defects have been found in children with cognitive and behavioral issues, and at a far higher rate than in the general population.

The good news is that these defects can potentially be addressed through the gut-brain axis and the metabolic signaling pathways. Early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions may significantly improve the long-term outcomes for these children.

Children in today’s world are exposed to toxins in the air, water, food, and even in their clothing. The toxic load is unimaginable when measured against earlier times when chemicals were less prevalent. These toxins impact a child’s body, harming the natural metabolic processes and compromising gut health.

Research has also discovered that many special needs children have an additional health condition: intestinal dysfunction. The evidence suggests a link between the balance of intestinal microorganisms in the digestive system and cognitive and behavioral challenges. Children with behavioral, cognitive, and communication issues were found to have higher quantities of the less beneficial gut bacteria and less of the bacteria known to be helpful.

The research suggests metabolic abnormalities and compromised gut health may trigger the development of behavioral and cognitive issues over time. The neurological system in children develops as a child grows, and optimum metabolic health and gut health is crucial to the development of a healthy, well-functioning neurological system.

April is Autism Awareness Month, allowing us all to learn more about the advances being made to help children with special needs through targeted nutrition.

The Spectrum Care+ Protocol is a natural, nutritional protocol developed to support optimum metabolic, gut, and neurological health in children. The Spectrum Care+ Protocol is being used with children and young adults in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Malaysia, and Indonesia, and is now available in the US.

The Spectrum Care+ Protocol is 100% natural, sourced from nature. The protocol is very simple, involving drinking Camelicious (100% whole camel milk powder) and a natural plant-based supplement, Spectrum Care+/ Metabolic Boost. When taken as directed, parents of special needs children have reported seeing improvements in cognition, social communication, behavior, digestion, and sleep patterns.

Parents want their children to be happy, healthy, and able to meet life’s challenges with confidence. When a child struggles with learning, social communication and behavioral issues, many parents seek natural help. The Spectrum Care+ Protocol offers a natural, nutritional approach to support better health and wellbeing for children with special needs.

Click here for more information about the Spectrum Care+ Protocol.

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